Trees of Tennessee’ coffee-table book

Tennessee Urban Forestry Council publishes ‘Trees of Tennessee’ coffee-table book featuring 68 of the state's landmark, notable trees

ORDER NOW: http://www.tufc.com/book

• Hardcover coffee table book with 128 full-color pages
• More than 150 images of 68 notable, champion, landmark, historic, and heritage trees
• Fascinating facts about notable tree species
• Legends and tales of…

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  • Tennessee Urban Forestry Council publishes ‘Trees of Tennessee’ coffee-table book featuring 68 of the state's landmark, notable trees

    ORDER NOW: http://www.tufc.com/book

    • Hardcover coffee table book with 128 full-color pages
    • More than 150 images of 68 notable, champion, landmark, historic, and heritage trees
    • Fascinating facts about notable tree species
    • Legends and tales of landmark and historic trees
    • East, Middle, West Tennessee sections
    • Introduction by TUFC co-founder Gene Hyde
    • Proceeds benefit TUFC programs for healthy and sustainable urban and community forests in Tennessee
  • 2 notes.

    1.  If you haven't herad, I have changed jobs here in the Division of Forestry due to a re-organization.  I'm now over the rural forestry programs.  The urban forestry porgram is still under my umbrella but Brian Rucker assumes the role of state urban forester.  I will still have a finger in the urban forestry program for TN and will on occasion post a note or two in The Grove but I'll be much less involved in urban forestry going forward

     

    2.  Anybody wondering about how the cold weather is going to affect trees and shrubs?  Here in Nashville we've had a couple of nights in the single digits and expect another night tonight.  Normally this won't affect our trees and shrubs - unless you've got something exotic and more suited to zone 8 or even 9 (like me).  But long ago and far away (3 decados ago when I lived in the plains states), we would sometimes get tree damage from sudden and severe drops of temperature, which we did have a couple weeks ago here.  A tree might be able to easily withstand temperatures of 10 below or 20 below if the temperature dropped normally from late fall into early winter.  But if temperatures were unusually warm for a few days, then dropped to zero in 3 - 4 hours, the trees would sometimes experience cold weather damage.  It's too soon to tell - we won't know for sure if or to what extent any of this cold weather will impact our trees, but be aware that we might have some weather related tree damage.

     

     

  • Great Pictures Neil.  thanks for posting.  I heard it was a great meeting.

  • Just got back from the Partners in Community Forestry National Conference (Pittsburgh, PA).  Great meeting. Over 500 folks from across North America attended.

  • Jennifer Smith, Metro-Nashville City Horticulturist, doing what she does best --- networking!

  • Brian Rucker, Tennessee Division of Forestry, getting an upfront seat before one of the many concurrent sessions.

  • Here's image of downtown Pittsburgh from deck of riverboat cruise.

  • Kasey Krouse, Knoxville Urban Forester, at Partners in Community Forestry National Conference (Pittsburgh, PA)

  • Thanks for the pics Neil!  Neil was a street captain, working both sides to make sure holes were dug right and trees were planted straight.  Great work Neil.

  • Had a great time helping 60 volunteers plant almost 100 Yoshino cherry trees in downtown Nashville last Saturday. Neighborhood residents will enjoy the benefits for years to come. 

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About Us

The mission of the Tennessee Urban Forestry Council (TUFC), as an advisory board, is to promote healthy and sustainable urban and community forests in Tennessee through leadership, advocacy, education and planning. For more information or to join the Tennessee Urban Forestry Council, visit www.tufc.com.

The Tennessee Division of Forestry extinguishes the more than 2,500 fires that burn each year and helps control the diseases and insects that plague our forests. Since trees provide energy savings and storm water reduction and add scenic beauty, the division is also working to market the benefits of adding trees to urban areas. For more information, visit www.state.tn.us/agriculture/forestry.

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