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  • Great data sheet, now I recognize it!

  • Here's the data sheet on Japanese hops.

  • Hi Jasen, do you have picture of Japanese Hops, I am curious what it looks like as I cannot associate that with something I have seen. 

  • Oof. We're having difficulty suppressing Japanese hops on Watershed lands within the city. It overtakes even Kudzu.

  • And technically Apis mellifera is also an invasive species from Europe, so I also do not get too hung up invasives unless they are crowding out a native plant that might ecologically benefit from their removal.  Pollinators are very important, so the case of bees, it is a big green light. 

  • Quite true Neil. Like I said I'm not in any way making a case for invasives. There are certainly many non-invasive plants that feed the Honey Bees just fine. Perhaps it says more about the resourcefulness of Apis mellifera than of the "benefits" of invasives.

  • Privet Honey, that is one I have not tried.  Interesting, never thought of it a source of nectar.  Still, I would rather plant a tulip poplar tree than privet as it is a great source nectar in Georgia. 
     
    Chris Turner said:

    Privet seems to be a bit easier to deal with if you stay diligent with it. Ivy just gets all over every thing; wrapped around trees climbing up walls. I really don't like ivy at all.

    I will say however that Honey Bees seem to love many of the invasive plant species. Whenever I have seen a privet hedge in bloom ( obviously not sheared )  it is covered with honey bees. Same with Ivy, Knot weed, and various others. I'm not at all making a case for invasives, but more of an interesting observation. As much as the arborist side of me hates invasive plants, the Beekeeping part of me secretly enjoys how much nectar the bees are able to get from them.

  • Privet seems to be a bit easier to deal with if you stay diligent with it. Ivy just gets all over every thing; wrapped around trees climbing up walls. I really don't like ivy at all.

    I will say however that Honey Bees seem to love many of the invasive plant species. Whenever I have seen a privet hedge in bloom ( obviously not sheared )  it is covered with honey bees. Same with Ivy, Knot weed, and various others. I'm not at all making a case for invasives, but more of an interesting observation. As much as the arborist side of me hates invasive plants, the Beekeeping part of me secretly enjoys how much nectar the bees are able to get from them.

  • 1080123498.pngPrivet!  Have your tried removing that stuff.  One of these days I will invest in a privet puller.  Has anyone every used one of those?

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