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  • I too, of course, really enjoy "The Lorax".  I also enjoy Lois Ehlert's book "Red Leaf, Yellow Leaf".  "Seeing Trees:..." by Nancy Ross Hugo is a great read.  I also love "What A Plant Knows" even though this covers more than trees.  My first tree book was "50 Trees of Indiana" guide we used in my Botany class in high school.  Sally Weeks book: "Native Trees of the Midwest" is a really great book as well.  Can you tell I like to read and I love trees/nature? ;)

  • A member of AG states he plants tree because he was inspired by the following book:

    I was inspired by a book, "Seeds" authored by Richard Horan.

  • A great book: :Between  Earth and Sky; Our Intimate Connection to Trees,-by Nalini Nadkarni,. University of California Press. Nadkarni is much much more that a topnotch cloud forest scientist and arbornaut, she is a poet and philosopher who waxes lyrical about trees and forests.  Larry Hamilton Charlotte, Vermont Tree warden

  • My favorite tree book is "The Tree Lady", a children's book based on the true story of Katherine Olivia Sessions.  She was the first woman to graduate with a science degree from the University of California in 1881.  She moved to San Diego to become a teacher, but left teaching to establish a nursery and transformed City Park from a dry, ugly hillside into a lush garden.  Trees from her nursery were planted all over San Diego.  I was so excited to find a book about the beginnings of urban forestry, just in time for my presentation to my son's class for Arbor Day!

  • I just heard of a tree book that sounds good this morning in my Toastmaster's Club - it's called "A Natural History of Western Trees" by Donald Culross Peattie. Tree stories for various species! It has great reviews and I can't wait to read it.

    The author is botanist and naturalist who has written many other books that also sound interesting.

  • Dirr is my all around favorite, on all ornamental, but my most memorable is Micheal Pollen's "Botany of Desire".

    His chapter on the desire for sweetness follows the apple tree from  Kazakhstan cradle to the ends of the earth. Telling you stuff they never told you in school about Johnny Appleseed.

    The chapter on Pot is also very revealing, canabonoid receptor in our bodies, (like endorphins receptors) and the connection to the Scythian culture & Flying ointment & broom handles, well, let's just say, no wonder they didn't teach us that in school.

  • Try to imagine a world without trees and soon you'll find their reach spans far beyond ecology. My favorite "tree book" is Walden by H.D. Thoreau. Far ahead of its time. 

    RT

  • Cool Phil,

    I hope you will share with the community when published. If not, and possible, please let me know.

    richardthurau@planitgeo.com

    Thanks

    Rich



    Wendell Phillips (Phil) Berwick said:

    Actually, I am writing a children's (picture) book. It will be Merferd and the Treetoons in "The Rope Swing Tree".

  • The Giving Tree has always creeped me out too. 
     
    Alex Johnson said:

    Lately my favorite tree book had been "Oak; the frame of civilization" by William Bryant Logan.  It basically gives an account of th erise of western civilization from our pagan roots through the worship, use and utilization of Quercus. 

     

    By the way, I'm glad to see "the giving tree" NOT on this list (maybe I should have scrolled down more to be sure).  What a creepy children's book.

  • Lately my favorite tree book had been "Oak; the frame of civilization" by William Bryant Logan.  It basically gives an account of th erise of western civilization from our pagan roots through the worship, use and utilization of Quercus. 

     

    By the way, I'm glad to see "the giving tree" NOT on this list (maybe I should have scrolled down more to be sure).  What a creepy children's book.

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